LEE & BAE, Busan

D-112, 47 Marine City 2nd St., Haeundae-gu, Busan, 48119 South Korea

galleryleebaekorea@gmail.com

www.galleryleebae.com

 

 

Mi-Hei Her (b. 1969, Seoul, Korea)

The surface of her secrets pouches and the boxes with faces is always bright and transparent, the artist that is, she can play all the limits of her works. Inside and outside, reality and fiction, image and object, writing and figures, self and the others, in another words, ‘Her’ and Mi-Hei Her diffract self in the silence and being happy to watch her fragile identities are shattered.

Most often printed on transparent film that covers the box. It easily shows and can read the fragments of the intimate diary of the past and the images of routine. So we could see today of "it was", as well as could see today of words that share with friends or neighborhood around directly or indirectly or today of neighborhood and street saw through the window.

Between of palimpsest -repeatedly erase and rewrote- and kaleidoscopic and between layering and juxtaposition, we could see the artist’s identity get lost in front of our eyes. Obsessively, decisively, delicately and very lucidly ‘Her’ and Mi-Hei Her, seeking writer, continued to write and be written by depositing her crystal Pandora boxes on the floor or by affixing to the walls and sometimes on the windows. Also moving on, perhaps, from suffering to the experience...

The author, artist –‘Her’ and Mi-Hei Her - request us to look her "I" with generosity between autobiography and self-fiction. She invites us to become a peculiarly, simultaneously viewer and reader for her messages of images and scriptures, to seduce us, to meet our own image scattered in the maze of manuscripts and typescripts, in the harmony of its reflected shadows and in their digitalized shadows.

 

Sang-Sun Bae (b. 1971, Hwasun, Korea)

Sang-Sun Bae has been making two types of paintings: one type made using blue-black ink and charcoal on white surfaces coated with gesso mixed with the blue-black ink, and another type made by drawing countless fine lines of gesso using a fine-point brush on surfaces of black velvet in a way that brings out the jet-black color. These works have their origins in abstracted profile lines extracted from figure sketches, and they thus carry a rhythm of organic lines that relate to the bonds that are formed between lives and also to her current knotted forms. Bae, who started off by drawing people in order to better understand herself, eventually developed an interest in the very movements of people. While exploring her thoughts through delving into the questions of what it means to be human and what it means to live, she eventually began to focus on the subtle changes in the air that occur between two posing models set in the different combinations of woman-woman, man-man, or man-woman. Here lies an important concept of Bae, who has discovered the imperceptible and indefinite aura or energy generated and exchanged between people that constantly shifts in direction and strength. The single placid lines that she makes differ from the slicing lines of the West: they are Eastern lines that mix the internal and external worlds together from both sides. Like traces of ink, they seep out into their surrounds and make observers conscious of the outside world.

— Emiko Hiraki (Art Director)

Soo-Whan Choi (b. 1972, Gyeongju, Korea)

Surface, skin or shell always calls for close attention. Shortcomings need to be masked and shining

surfaces need to be polished for brighter shine. That’s what I learned and how I lived. However, people often neglect the fact that the shell is both a cover that hides the inside and a window that shows the inside. Shell is similar to a frame in that it reveals and hides at the same time. Depending on how something is placed in a frame, what is covered and what is concealed, its interpretation can vary. The ultimate question boils down to “what to expose”, not the substance. A shell is both a wall and a window, and a frame that opens up opportunities for new interpretation.

Soo-Whan Choi makes a hole in this shell. Choi’s work resembles the duality of a shell in that it splits space into two but connects them at the same time. The shape reveals itself only when the inner space interacts with the outer space. The shape does not dominate the space with its physical weight. The light — the source of the shape — already existed in the inner space and its image and

pattern is determined by the location and number of the small holes. The ray of light emitted through the countless fine holes interconnects to reveal a subtle yet sensual shape — a shape unpredictable in nature or in geometric decoration. An aura is created from an architectural structure in an exquisite combination of proportion and symmetry. Sensation and shape made possible only through the conscious fight against mannerism and the commitment for meticulously weaving a structure.

Mi-Hei Her
Entre-deux
2018, Mixed media, 40 x 40 x 9.5 cm.
Mi-Hei Her
Entre-deux
2018, Mixed media, 40 x 40 x 9.6 cm.
Mi-Hei Her
Entre-deux
2018, Mixed media, 100 x 40 x 9.5 cm.
Sang-Sun Bae
Cloud 1
2018, Gesso on velvet, 60.5 x 50 cm.
Sang-Sun Bae
Ever Expanding 2-1, 2-2
2018, Gesso on velvet, 224 x 145 cm. each
Sang-Sun Bae
Ever Expanding
2018, Gesso on velvet, 72.5 x 100 cm. each
Sang-Sun Bae
Rain 3
2018, Gesso on velvet, 33.4 x 24.2 cm.
Soo-Whan Choi
Emptiness
2019, LED Plexiglas, 152.9 x 190.9 x 10 cm.
Soo-Whan Choi
Emptiness Moonlight
2017, LED laminate, 97 x 145.5 x 10 cm.
Soo-Whan Choi
Emptiness Bamboo Grove
2018, LED Plexiglas, 190.9 x 152.9 x 10 cm.
Jin-Wook Yeom
Memory of Mountain
2017, Oil on canvas, 162 x 113 cm.
Jin-Wook Yeom
Memory of Mountain
2017, Oil on canvas, 163 x 112 cm.